theatlantic:

Did I Really Go to Harvard if I Got My Degree Taking Online Courses?

About two years ago, my classmates and I gathered in Harvard Yard to receive our graduate degrees alongside more than 7,000 of the university’s newest alumni. As the procession made its way to our designated seating area, an onlooker eyed our banner with a puzzled look and asked the guy in front of me, “What in the world is the Extension School?”
 My classmate’s reply: “It’s the back door into Harvard.” Ouch.
I often felt the same way – that I’d snuck into one of the world’s premier institutions for higher learning. There is little chance that my slightly-above-average undergraduate GPA and an extra-curricular résumé that only consisted of a part-time job at a music store would’ve secured a spot for me in one of Harvard’s ultra-competitive graduate schools. Yet, with no admission letter in hand and exactly zero hours spent preparing for graduate admissions tests, I became a Harvard student. And I was not alone. The Extension School – Harvard’s degree-granting continuing education school – has a student population of more than 13,000. In fact, almost all of the Ivy League schools offer courses to “nontraditional students,” which the National Center for Education Statistics considers to be those who are older than typical college graduates, work full-time, or are financially independent and may have family dependents.
Read more. [Image: InSapphoWeTrust/flickr]


  Thank you to whoever wrote this and a special fuck you to everyone who decided just because they went to a certain school within the University that they could decide what is “real” Harvard.

theatlantic:

Did I Really Go to Harvard if I Got My Degree Taking Online Courses?

About two years ago, my classmates and I gathered in Harvard Yard to receive our graduate degrees alongside more than 7,000 of the university’s newest alumni. As the procession made its way to our designated seating area, an onlooker eyed our banner with a puzzled look and asked the guy in front of me, “What in the world is the Extension School?”


My classmate’s reply: “It’s the back door into Harvard.” Ouch.

I often felt the same way – that I’d snuck into one of the world’s premier institutions for higher learning. There is little chance that my slightly-above-average undergraduate GPA and an extra-curricular résumé that only consisted of a part-time job at a music store would’ve secured a spot for me in one of Harvard’s ultra-competitive graduate schools. Yet, with no admission letter in hand and exactly zero hours spent preparing for graduate admissions tests, I became a Harvard student.

And I was not alone. The Extension School – Harvard’s degree-granting continuing education school – has a student population of more than 13,000. In fact, almost all of the Ivy League schools offer courses to “nontraditional students,” which the National Center for Education Statistics considers to be those who are older than typical college graduates, work full-time, or are financially independent and may have family dependents.

Read more. [Image: InSapphoWeTrust/flickr]

  Thank you to whoever wrote this and a special fuck you to everyone who decided just because they went to a certain school within the University that they could decide what is “real” Harvard.



My two friends working in admissions really need to start a blog, I mean who doesn’t want to laugh at gems like this:

Prospect: “I see that you all are ranked #2 in the US this year” 
(Awkward Pause)
My friend: “Oh, really? I didn’t realize that those things mattered.”

 



Anonymous: Do you think going through the HGSE program gave you a boost in your job search?


Yes, especially since I want to do research and I did the research track for Prevention Science. Being able to say I wanted to spend an entire year doing intensive work to improve my research skills seems to have impressed the people I’ve been interviewing with. My adviser was also pleased enough with the work my partner and I did during the year that he got us a year long paid contract to continue our research. Do know your markets and be familiar with what states actually fund educational research and those that don’t care. Coming back to Georgia definitely slowed me down and I’ve had much better success finding relevant jobs in Massachusetts, New York, Washington, New Jersey, and Washington D.C. If you’d like to chat more about this, feel free to email me at mlj793@gmail.com.






cambridgerealestate:

Harvard Yard in the fall (by Dmitrii Lezine)

cambridgerealestate:

Harvard Yard in the fall (by Dmitrii Lezine)

(via diedenker)



(via diedenker)



HOW I RESPOND WHEN HE SAYS HE GOES TO SCHOOL IN CAMBRIDGE AND WAITS FOR ME TO ASK WHERE

thebostongays:

(via nextyearsgirl)



Still makes me laugh.

Still makes me laugh.



brensiesinboston:

“It’s a battered old suitcase and a hotel someplace and a wound that will never heal.” 

brensiesinboston:

“It’s a battered old suitcase and a hotel someplace and a wound that will never heal.” 



jamespbrady:

untitled by -microbes on Flickr.